Yale Fertility Study

woman and baby

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) – When it comes to getting pregnant, a Yale study shows women have misconceptions about baby making.

Yale researchers surveyed a thousand women between the ages of 18 and 40 to find out what they know or do not know about getting pregnant. They discovered that important information was not getting across to many of them.

Jess Cantres is a single 25-year-old, but having kids is important to her.

“I’ve always thought kind of like once I hit my late 20′s, early 30′s,” said Cantres.

According to the Yale Study, 40 percent of the women surveyed believe they would have a tough time getting pregnant, but only 20 percent actually spoke to their doctors about their concerns.

“Almost a third of women had no idea that things like weight can contribute to infertility – either too heavy or too thin, smoking, history of sexually transmitted infections,” said specialist Dr. Mary Jane Minkin.

Noted specialist Dr. Mary Jane Minkin framed some of the questions.

“40 percent of the women thought we kept on making eggs, not the fact that we indeed are born with the eggs we’re going to have,” said Dr. Minkin.

This is a number that diminishes as a woman ages. When it comes to folic acid and reproductive health, researchers found most women are like Jess.

Folic Acid

When Jess was asked if she was taking folic acid, the response was, “no, not right now but I should.”

Folic acid reduces the risk of birth defects. Taking it is recommended, given that half of the pregnancies in the United States are not planned.

“If you’re not using birth control, do take some folic acid because in case you do happen to get pregnant, you would have been on folic acid,” recommends Dr. Minkin.

Having trouble getting pregnant? Dr. Minkin says don’t wait too long. “If you’ve been trying to get pregnant for a year under the age of 35, I suggest that you do contact your health care provider and start doing some simple fertility tests.”

If you are over the age of 35, Dr. Minkin says to call your doctor after six months of trying.

In the meantime, Jess is taking healthy steps by “…just staying active, eating the right things, making sure that physically everything is all set. That way, four years from now, I don’t have troubles when it comes conception or anything like that.”      

For more information, visit www.knowsooner.com  or March of Dimes

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