New proposal would force commercial landlords to disclose property information

Landlords

Its lights were on for just a few weeks. Now, in the dark, workers dismantle John Turek’s dream Jeep customization shop.

“I cry every night because I’ve lost everything. It was a dream,” Turek said.

It’s not that he wanted to close it.

It was the green dust that you’ll find in the ducts, the walls, and in the corners. That green dust is Hexavalent Chromium, a chemical that can be used to clean jet engine parts. It can also cause cancer.

The problem? Turek says he was never told about it.

Turek did tell our cameras about it, and word has made it from his warehouse to the state house.

“Landlords with commercial real estate have to disclose certain conditions about their property,” said Democratic Senator Paul Doyle, who represents Rocky Hill. He introduced a bill to committee Thursday that aims at changing what landlords have to tell tenants.

If it’s an apartment or residential property, landlords have to tell you what if any chemicals are inside. But if you are renting a space for business, they don’t have to tell you anything. That’s what this law would change.

It has a long way to go before it’s the law of the land.One step is a public hearing, where Turek and opponents plan to sound off.

“Some in the commercial real estate may oppose it, so I think it could be a lively debate,” Doyle said.

That public hearing is expected to take place by the end of the month.

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