Tips to keep your heart healthy

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NEW HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) — In honor of National Wear Red Day, News 8′s Kent Pierce gives some tips on how you can keep your heart healthy.

Eat right and exercise is good advice for everybody who wants to prevent heart disease. Determining whether or not you have heart disease can get more complicated, especially for women.

Out of the ambulance, and into the emergency department. This is not a trip you want to make, but so many do because of heart disease.

“It’s the number one cause of death in all women, exceeds all cancer, over half a million women a year,” said Dr. Glen Henry, Yale New Haven Hospital Cardiologist.

Dr. Henry wore a red tie today to help raise awareness of heart disease, something doctors at Yale New Haven Hospital say is largely preventable.

“You know if folks follow a heart healthy diet, get regular exercise and, most importantly, follow the instructions provided by their physician,” said Dr. Abeel Mangi, Yale New Haven Hospital Cardiac Surgeon.

“Know what your weight is. Remember that you have to exercise for 30 minutes a day in whatever fashion you, as a person, are fit to do. Got to know your blood pressure, your cholesterol, and your blood sugar values,” said Dr. Glen Henry.

The American Heart Association has been asking people to wear red on the first Friday in February for more than a decade now. Now everybody can participate, but it began as Wear Red for Women Day, because heart disease in women is actually harder to detect.

“You can get severe sweating, nausea, shortness of breath. Any of these symptoms all in constellation would be a concern,” said Dr. Jude Clancy, Yale New Haven Hospital.

“The symptoms are often not the classic chest pressure and things like that, so it requires a little bit more perseverance and awareness that something is wrong with their body and they need to pursue it,” said Dr. Lynda Rosenfeld, Yale New Haven Hospital.

Make sure you know your body and notice when something changes. Doctors say there are lots of options for treatment these days.

“Things as minimally invasive as stents inside the heart, pacemakers or more sophisticated options such as valve replacement or valve repair.” said Dr. Abeel Mangi, Yale New Haven Hospital Cardiac Surgeon.

 

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