Arthur lashing Canada; US communities clean up

A lobster fisherman slips but holds on while trying to secure lines to his fishing boat after the floating dock broke apart during tropical storm Arthur in Escuminac, New Brunswick, on Saturday, July 5, 2014.  (AP Photo//The Canadian Press, Diane Doiron)
A lobster fisherman slips but holds on while trying to secure lines to his fishing boat after the floating dock broke apart during tropical storm Arthur in Escuminac, New Brunswick, on Saturday, July 5, 2014. (AP Photo//The Canadian Press, Diane Doiron)

KILL DEVIL HILLS, N.C. (AP) — Arthur has been downgraded to a tropical storm, but its winds are still near-hurricane strength as they lash Canada’s maritime provinces.

Utilities in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick says about 200,000 customers are without power. The storm also is causing flight delays and cancellations at the region’s largest airport in Halifax.

Meanwhile, New England was largely spared from much storm damage spawned, though utility crews in Maine and Vermont have been working to restore power to more than 20,000.

Arthur dumped about 8 inches of rain in parts of southeastern Massachusetts, causing extreme street and area flooding in New Bedford. But the water has receded.

Farther south, North Carolina’s popular beach towns are returning to the business of recreation. But the ocean churned by Arthur remains dangerous and lifeguards have had no-swimming warnings posted because of powerful rip currents.

People walk along a flooded street near the waterfront in Manteo, N.C., Friday, July 4, 2014 after Hurricane Arthur passed through the area leaving some roads underwater. Hurricane Arthur began moving offshore and away from North Carolina's Outer Banks early Friday after hitting the state's barrier islands overnight, creating a Fourth of July holiday that saw flooding and tens of thousands of power outages. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
People walk along a flooded street near the waterfront in Manteo, N.C., Friday, July 4, 2014 after Hurricane Arthur passed through the area leaving some roads underwater. Hurricane Arthur began moving offshore and away from North Carolina’s Outer Banks early Friday after hitting the state’s barrier islands overnight, creating a Fourth of July holiday that saw flooding and tens of thousands of power outages. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

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