New Haven man gets 11 years in fake prescription scheme

FILE - This Feb. 19, 2013, file photo, shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin. Amid an epidemic of addiction and abuse tied to these powerful opioids drugs, the CDC is urging general doctors to try physical therapy, exercise and over-the-counter pain medications before turning to painkillers for chronic pain. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)
FILE - This Feb. 19, 2013, file photo, shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. Prescription painkillers should not be a first-choice for treating common ailments like back pain and arthritis, according to new federal guidelines designed to reshape how doctors prescribe drugs like OxyContin and Vicodin. Amid an epidemic of addiction and abuse tied to these powerful opioids drugs, the CDC is urging general doctors to try physical therapy, exercise and over-the-counter pain medications before turning to painkillers for chronic pain. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A New Haven man is headed to federal prison for his role in a scheme to sell opioids obtained through fake prescriptions.

New Haven Register reports that 38-year-old Alejandrino DeJesus was sentenced Monday to 11 years behind bars. He pleaded guilty in August to one count of conspiracy to acquire oxycodone by fraud or forgery.

Investigators say those involved in the conspiracy obtained the personal information of medical practitioners and used the information to create fraudulent prescriptions.

Authorities say the members also purchased legitimate prescriptions for oxycodone from individuals and then used “runners” to fill the prescriptions at pharmacies throughout Connecticut.

Federal prosecutors say DeJesus was one of the key members who recruited and transported the runners.

DeJesus’s lawyer says his client was motivated by his own drug addictions.

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Information from: New Haven Register, http://www.nhregister.com

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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