Saltmarsh Sparrow may become extinct

sparrow

(WTNH) — According to Connecticut’s State of the Birds, the bird species known as the ‘Saltmarsh Sparrow’ could become extinct within the next fifty years. It has been said that these birds are in danger due to climate change and the rising tide’s that are destroying their nests.

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Chris Elphick, an Associate Professor of Biology from the University of Connecticut stated, “The fact that these marshes are changing so rapidly and the birds are rapidly declining it’s not just about the birds. It’s telling us something about this coastal system that they’re changing and a lot of people live along the coast.”

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Connecticut’s Audubon Society as well as other environmental leaders have expressed that they would like to see more funding towards the study regarding the impact of rising tides. This species is not the only one that is being affect. Other birds that are being effected are Clapper Rails and the Seaside Sparrow.

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