Back to school issues with your pets

(WTNH)-When children go back to school, the stress can be huge on the family, including the dog.  This abrupt change in routine can seriously affect our furry friends, who are creatures of habit. But with a little understanding families can avoid many of the back-to-school behavior problems their dogs might display. Richard and Vicki Horowitz from Bark Busters have tips to to help manage the behavioral changes our dogs may exhibit.

  • Pay less attention to him: While your dog may be the center of attention when the kids are home all day, you need to change this scenario so that he can adjust more quickly to the quiet time.
  • Begin by separating him from the kids and the rest of the family. For example, if you frequently take your dog with you to run errands, leave him at home.
  • Practice leaving the house: Go through the motions of leaving the house, go out the door, but then come right back in again. The dog will cease associating the routine of your leaving the house with your departure. This will help him to be more relaxed when you actually leave.
  • When you leave: As the last person leaves the house for the day, don’t confuse your dog by saying in a sweet voice, “It’s okay, Buster—we’ll be home soon. Be a good boy.” If he is feeling concerned that you’re leaving, your happy, high-pitched voice can make him think it’s okay to feel anxious. Dogs are pack animals and so they expect their leaders to be strong when they leave the pack. Therefore, ignore your dog for several minutes before you leave.

 

  • Toys: Dogs love toys, but they can quickly get bored with or destroy them. Buy high-quality, virtually indestructible puzzle toys that your dog will always enjoy, such as those that hold treats like the GameChanger. Every few days, rotate what toys are available to him. This gives your dog something new and fun to hold his interest.
  • Scatter food: Dogs are natural foragers who enjoy looking for food on the ground—and will literally spend hours doing so. Scatter a variety of foods—such as bits of raw vegetables, dog kibble, and other foods that won’t attract wasps—around the yard when you leave. Try hiding a few treats so your dog spends extra time looking for them. And always provide lots of fresh, clean water to keep your dog well hydrated.

 

  • Crate: Most dogs love the safety of a crate. Because they are descended from animals that live in dens, a crate is a natural shelter for a dog because it has the same characteristics of a den. If your dog hasn’t been crate trained, don’t start training him the day the kids leave for school. That’s too late and can actually add to his stress. When your dog has become accustomed to his new crate, do not leave him there for extended periods of time. If you plan to be away longer than 10 hours for a dog and 6 hours for a puppy, ask a friend to come by to let your dog out to toilet during that time.
  • Laundry room: If your dog will be inside all day and you are concerned about him toileting in the house, enclose him in a small room (which inhibits the tendency to toilet) and has an easy-clean floor of vinyl or tile (in case he has an accident). Place a soft bed and toys in the room for him too.
  • Doghouse: If your dog will be kept outside while you are gone, be sure he has shelter in which to get out of the weather. Dogs are more relaxed when they are covered and in familiar surroundings. Place the doghouse next to the house so that he feels like it is an extension of the larger “den,” and provide a blanket or other comfy bedding.

 

 

  • Train the kids: Parents need to promote child safety by telling their children to avoid going right to the dog’s area as soon as they get home. Kids should ignore the pet for several minutes to allow the dog to settle down. With young children, it is always best to have a parent present to reduce the chance of a problem. Once your dog learns the routine, he will relax.
  • Train your dog: It is amazing how quickly dogs learn what is acceptable and what is not. The bottom line is to have clear rules and expectations for our canine friends.

 

 

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