LAPD has interviewed a potential Harvey Weinstein sexual assault victim

(ABC News) — The Los Angeles Police Department’s Robbery Homicide Division has interviewed a potential victim of a sexual assault involving Harvey Weinstein, which allegedly occurred in 2013, ABC News has confirmed.

The case is under investigation.

Earlier today, New York Police Department Chief of Detectives Robert Boyce said that New York City police have referred allegations against the disgraced film mogul to other police departments, though it was not clear if the LAPD investigation pertained to one of those cases. The referrals were made to jurisdictions in the United States and overseas based on calls to a police hotline about Weinstein, Boyce added.

Police declined to discuss specifics.

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“Several calls have been received on our CrimeStoppers Hotline regarding Mr. Weinstein,” Boyce said. “None of those calls have alleged any criminal conduct within the New York City area.”

Complaints about Weinstein cannot be pursued locally if they involve events that occurred outside New York City.

More than three dozen women have accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct, including harassment and assault, but he has not been charged with a crime.

The movie producer has acknowledged inappropriate behavior, but has “unequivocally denied” any allegations of non-consensual sex, his spokesman said.

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Weinstein, 65, was terminated by The Weinstein Company in the wake of the allegations, though he later offered his resignation. ABC News confirmed that he is also pursuing a claim that he was wrongfully fired.

In addition, he was expelled from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and the Producers Guild of America has voted to begin termination proceedings against him. A final determination will be reached next month. On Thursday the board of British Film Institute voted to strip Weinstein of its prestigious BFI Fellowship honor, which he was awarded in 2002.

“Sexual harassment, abuse and bullying is unacceptable under any circumstances. Everyone working in the film industry – in any industry – should be safe and respected in the workplace. We wholeheartedly support those brave enough to come forward and speak out,” the board said in a statement. “The film industry needs more women represented on every level, on and off screen.”