40 Years Later: A look back at the Blizzard of ’78

These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
These photos, taken from old slides and sent to us via ReportIt from John Garvin, show the University of Connecticut in Storrs as students reacted to the historic storm. Garvin says at the time, no one knew just how bad the storm was going to be. (WTNH/ReportIt/John Garvin)
A giant loader shovels a load of snow for waiting trucks as snow removal operations continued in Hartford and throughout Connecticut, Feb. 8, 1978. A monster snowstorm dumped as much as 20 inches on the state Monday and Tuesday. (AP Photo/Bob Child)
This message was dug out in the snow on the surface of a lake in Montville, Connecticut, Feb. 8, 1978. It asked for Gov. Ella T. Grasso's help in the state's snow emergency. The author of the message was unknown, but it got across to the governor who saw it as she flew over the lake on a helicopter tour of eastern Connecticut. (AP Photo/Bob Child)
The first vehicle rolls out of a military transport plane as U.S. Army troops from Ft. Hood, Texas, arrive at Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Conn., Feb. 8, 1978. The Army detachment had been sent to assist in snow removal operations in Connecticut after a 24-hour blizzard hit the Northeast on Feb. 6. (AP Photo/Bob Child, file)
A front end loader is parked outside the giant U.S. Air Force cargo plane from which it was unloaded at Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks, Ct., as the first plane load of U.S. Army personnel and equipment arrived, Feb. 9, 1978. The Army detachment from Ft. Hood, Texas, will aid in clearing away snow from the blizzard which hit Connecticut earlier in the week. (AP Photo/Bob Child)
Two members of the U.S. Army 27th Engineers from Fort Bragg, N.C. move their bulldozers slowly toward downtown Boston as the city began to remove the record snowfall from the streets, seen in this Feb. 11, 1978 file photo. (AP Photo/file)
Cars and trucks stranded and abandoned in deep snow along Route 128 in Dedham, Mass., are seen in this Feb. 9, 1978 photo, as military and civilian plows begin to dig them out during the blizzard of 1978. (AP Photo)
Roy Sodersjerna of Higham, Mass. suns himself on the hood of his car which is stuck in snow on Massachusetts Route 128 in Dedham, Mass. in this Feb. 9, 1978 file photo. Sodersjerna, who waits for plows and tow trucks to dig him out, has been living at a Red Cross shelter nearby since being trapped in the storm three days earlier. (AP Photo/File)
A National Guardsman checks a stranded car Feb. 9, 1978, in Hampton, N.H., after the Blizzard of '78 to see if anyone was trapped inside. A winter storm combined with high tides flooded the New Hampshire seacoast 25 years ago. (AP Photo/Tim Savard)

The Blizzard of 1978 was one of the most impressive storms ever to hit New England. It crossed through 40 years ago this week, and we’re taking a look back at the event, which killed 99 people in the region and brought record snowfall, with these pictures.

Thanks to John Garvin, who was a graduate student at the University of Connecticut in Storrs at the time, for sending in many of these photos using our News 8 ReportIt feature. Click through the slides to see all of the pictures.

Here’s what John had to say about his photos (slides 1-10):

“I don’t think it was snowing much at all on Monday morning. I lived off campus and drove in. Everyone attending classes. I did some work in a windowless room in the morning and when I got out, it was snowing very hard. Luckily, I had a shovel in the trunk of my car and was able to shovel a path out of the parking lot. I think I was one of the last cars out sometime mid-afternoon.

The photos were taken Tuesday when the bulk of the storm was over. A second wave of snow came by that day and dumped another 6-8 inches if I remember correctly. Everyone on campus turned into little kids throwing snow at each other, playing games, and sliding down hills on cafeteria trays and any cardboard they could get their hands on.

Even though snow was predicted, no one expected the amount we got. Back in those days, schools stayed open a lot more than they do now. College students had it easy during the storm compared to the ‘real world.'”